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Rubrik - Blog - Cranfield University Chooses Rubrik for Disaster Recovery to the Cloud and Simplified Data Management

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Cranfield University Chooses Rubrik for Disaster Recovery to the Cloud and Simplified Data Management

Cranfield University, a British postgraduate university, is a global leader for education and transformational research in technology and management. Every year, Cranfield University delivers academic courses in 50 countries outside of the UK and executive development to over 15,000 people. Cranfield is one of the UK’s top five commercial research-intensive universities. We recently spoke with Edward Poll, Head of IT Infrastructure, about their experience with Rubrik. Tell us about Cranfield’s IT strategy. What is the IT team responsible for? As a leading global research institution, demand for agile services from our users is continuously increasing. We need forward-thinking technology within our infrastructure that will give us hands-free management and automated orchestration, providing DevOps-like functionality while minimizing downtime, so we can effectively support the university’s 1,600 staff and 4,000 postgraduate students. Cloud is also top of mind for us, especially for disaster recovery. Our goal is to leverage the agility and cost savings of cloud infrastructure. What challenges did you previously have with data protection? Previously, we were replicating to a third-party host. A weakness of this approach was that if our two on-site resilient data centres were completely down, we had no easy way to fully restore services from our…
Rubrik - Blog - Understanding RPO and RTO

General Tech

Understanding RPO and RTO

As enterprises utilize more and more business-critical digital services, information technology infrastructure and applications have become key strategic imperatives. Downtime and data loss translate to a huge business and financial impact that  must be minimized with an effective data protection strategy. When planning for a data protection strategy or a disaster recovery plan (DRP), there are several criteria to consider in order to align with the business impact of various applications and workloads. A Business Impact Analysis (BIA) can help assess and weigh the impact and consequences, both financial and non-financial, of an interruption in business operations. These findings can help organizations determine their availability Service Level Agreements (SLA), or the level of service expected by the customer from the entity that provides the service. Most often, multiple SLAs are defined to match the various levels of criticality that were determined during the BIA. For example, the following SLAs are commonly utilized: 99%, or two 9s, corresponds to 3 days 15 hours and 36 minutes of downtime per year. 99.9%, or three 9s, corresponds to 8 hours 45 minutes and 36 seconds of downtime per year. 99.99%, or four 9s, corresponds to 52 minutes and 34 seconds of downtime per…
Rubrik - Blog - Tips for Migrating Your App to the Cloud

General Tech

Tips for Migrating Your App to the Cloud

In this age of falling cloud computing costs and hybrid cloud infrastructures, many businesses are trying to find a path to migrate their apps to the cloud. There are a myriad of reasons why app migration is top of mind: Potential cost savings Disaster recovery uses App refactoring or modernization Access to burstable resources Integration with SaaS platforms or new cloud-based tools (e.g. Amazon RDS, Azure App Services, and Google Cloud Spanner) In this blog post, I will explore some of the concepts and requirements needed to migrate an app from an on-premises data center to another location. This secondary location is typically a cloud provider, but many of the concepts apply when moving to a DR site, or even a developer’s laptop. In our example, we’ll use one of the most ubiquitous three-tier apps available: WordPress. The diagram below describes the components of our app. Understand Your App Let’s be honest—apps can be complex. If you’ve amassed technical debt in regard to documenting your apps or have little understanding of how they connect with other apps or business processes, you will have some homework to do. You’ll need to document and fully comprehend all aspects of your app, including:…
Rubrik - Blog - How to Get Started with Open Source Projects

General Tech

How to Get Started with Open Source Projects

So you want to start dabbling in open source? There are tons of reasons why contributing to open source projects is a rewarding use of time–from advancing your career to supporting a community you like. But contributing to an open source project for the first time can be incredibly intimidating. Like many, I was apprehensive about contributing to open source projects at first. I kept putting it off, thinking that I would eventually help out when I had more to offer. But you don’t need to be an expert to support an open source project–you don’t even need to write code to be a contributor. The opportunities are often quite broad and many communities, like Rubrik Build, accept code and non-code contributions. Here are some easy ways to get started with open source: Join the Conversation The simplest and fastest way to get started with open source projects is to contribute your thoughts. No code required! Join in the conversation and offer your experience or use cases. This can be done with Slack conversations or providing input on issues associated with projects on GitHub. Alternatively, start the conversation by filing an issue for a project. Tell us if something isn’t…
Rubrik - Blog - How to Throw a Disaster Recovery Tabletop Workshop

General Tech

How to Throw a Disaster Recovery Tabletop Workshop

Ransomware and destructive malware. You either groan with media fatigue or cringe at the thought of getting blown off the map by bitcoin bandits…perhaps both. For many organizations, creating a multi-leveled disaster recovery plan to accommodate this potential threat is now a top priority. The problem is, many organizations create a DR plan but don’t test each year. It’s easy to procrastinate DR testing, as it’s a costly activity in terms of both hours and infrastructure. But failure to test in a complete and realistic scenario can leave an organization woefully unprepared for some of the ancillary activities like communication and ownership of action. Essentially, the first time the crisis team meets should never be during a crisis. Simulating an attack around a table with a few colleagues doesn’t replace live testing, but it does uncover things you may not otherwise think of. This blog series will help walk through the setup and execution of a tabletop exercise for testing your DR plan. In true RPG style, this post will show how to simulate an unfolding disaster and apply your DR strategy in response. The advantage of running a tabletop exercise is its lightweight impact in terms of time and…