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WannaCry

Rubrik -  - How to Avoid Ransomware Jail

General Tech

How to Avoid Ransomware Jail

It’s 1983, and Ronald Reagan is sitting down to watch the hit film War Games. Five days later, the president asked his secretaries of state, “Could a scenario like war games ever happen?” One week later, General Vessey returned with the answer: “Mr. President, it is a lot worse than you think.” Was this the first time that cyber security and privacy had surfaced in computer systems? Categorically, no. Security and Privacy in Computer systems 1967 by Willis Ware was the first paper on the topic — written in 1967. So, since the beginning of networked computing, cyber security, and privacy have been a factor. So, why is it suddenly a huge industry buzzword? My thoughts on this are twofold: Across governments, the use and ideas of cyber warfare were dismissed, ignored, or forgotten. But in 2007, the Aurora test categorically proved that cyber attackers could inflict physical damage using computer tools. This was a pivotal moment, as critical infrastructure was at risk. Cybercrime then shifted to the public sphere with cyber groups lining their sights on non-government attacks, such as online fraud, ransomware, malware, and phishing. The role that security and privacy now play in IT and our personal lives…
Rubrik -  - Combating the Evolving Landscape of Ransomware

General Tech

Combating the Evolving Landscape of Ransomware

About one year ago today, we pointed out an emerging security crisis in the healthcare industry. Cyber threats targeting hospital data were becoming a regular event, with some computer systems held captive for a reputedly multi-million dollar ransom. Beyond the Bitcoin cost, ransomware puts patient care at risk since many organizations must stop operations for over a week. More recently, the worldwide spread of a virus known as “WannaCry” has been decimating operations at UK healthcare provider National Health Service (NHS) in addition to telecom, logistics, and car manufacturers. In total, it has caused havoc to over 230,000 computers in 150 countries. This attack has been aggressively accelerating while CIOs struggle to find a realistic solution. The root cause comes down to the usual suspects: a combination of phishing emails and poorly patched security vulnerabilities. This particular vulnerability was so caustic that Microsoft released an update to several of their deprecated operating systems such as Windows XP and Server 2003. Additionally, users need to stop using older protocols like SMB 1.0 because they create a multitude of vulnerabilities that allow attackers to commandeer a system. It’s on the vendor and partner communities to come up with innovative and effective methods…