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devops

Rubrik -  - How Infrastructure as Code Supports DevOps Best Practices

General Tech

How Infrastructure as Code Supports DevOps Best Practices

As operations increasingly migrate to the cloud, there are more opportunities to develop support solutions and infrastructure, from ensuring security to improving integrations. Infrastructure as code can help you increase automation and reduce your deployment cycle time so you can help more customers interested in these services. Incorporating infrastructure as code into your IT org’s practices can help eliminate costly human setup errors and inconsistencies, save time, and more easily debug issues with your team or the open source community at large. What is Infrastructure as Code, Anyway? Infrastructure as Code (or IaC) is a descriptive model that allows you to automatically generate a desired environment, including networks, VMs, and connection types. IaC uses the same type of versioning approach that DevOps and software engineering teams use in source code, but it’s applied to build the exact same environment for each and every deployment. Consider IaC a method of automating the process of test environment setup. In the past, you would have had to manually specify the machines, configuration, and network each time you were testing an application in a particular environment. The manual approach is prone to human error and quite time-consuming. IaC automates the process by giving you…
Rubrik -  - How to Get Started with Open Source Projects

General Tech

How to Get Started with Open Source Projects

So you want to start dabbling in open source? There are tons of reasons why contributing to open source projects is a rewarding use of time–from advancing your career to supporting a community you like. But contributing to an open source project for the first time can be incredibly intimidating. Like many, I was apprehensive about contributing to open source projects at first. I kept putting it off, thinking that I would eventually help out when I had more to offer. But you don’t need to be an expert to support an open source project–you don’t even need to write code to be a contributor. The opportunities are often quite broad and many communities, like Rubrik Build, accept code and non-code contributions. Here are some easy ways to get started with open source: Join the Conversation The simplest and fastest way to get started with open source projects is to contribute your thoughts. No code required! Join in the conversation and offer your experience or use cases. This can be done with Slack conversations or providing input on issues associated with projects on GitHub. Alternatively, start the conversation by filing an issue for a project. Tell us if something isn’t…
Rubrik -  - Rubrik Live Mount: More Than a Recovery Feature!

Product

Rubrik Live Mount: More Than a Recovery Feature!

Rubrik’s Live Mount for VMware VMs is one of those features that has been around since the very first version of the product. But over the last 5 years, the feature has changed a bit, broadening to support both SQL Server and Oracle databases as well as Hyper-V VMs. And as the breadth of what Live Mount supports has expanded, so has its capabilities. Live Mount offers both security and efficiency enhancements, but the core technology that powers the ability to take point-in-time snapshots of objects stored within Rubrik and present them back to a source has remained unchanged. And let’s face it; 5 years is a long time, and during that time, we have seen Live Mount providing our customers a means to restore faster, as testimonials like the one below can attest. But aside from just faster recovery, we are also seeing our customers utilize Live Mount to solve some other challenges in their day-to-day operations. Being able to duplicate point-in-time copies of a production environment with Rubrik Live Mount supports many unique scenarios that stretch far beyond recovery. If you are wondering how Live Mount may fit into your operations, think of it as an enabler rather…
Rubrik -  - NoSQL Replication Is Not Backup

General Tech

NoSQL Replication Is Not Backup

As we kick off 2019, I wanted to reflect back on a trend that has continued to gain momentum over the past few years–the march towards cloud-native applications that rely on highly-distributed and non-relational NoSQL databases. Our industry increasingly relies on architectures that embrace scale-out, highly-distributed systems. From small startups designing entirely in the cloud to large enterprises developing net new customer facing applications, the move to NoSQL databases has increased across the globe. While cloud-native architectures and, in particular, NoSQL databases solve problems such as resiliency from hardware failures and geographic distribution, they also amplify a few common pitfalls. One of the biggest challenges is that because NoSQL databases have done such an excellent job with native database replication, many organizations are fooled into a false sense of protection. The irony here is that by solving one major problem, many others now lurk in the background, leaving critical customer data at risk. As organizations continue to deploy production applications on NoSQL databases, it’s nearly inevitable that the data will become unavailable or corrupted. What happens in the event of a virus attack, data corruption, or a simple human error such as an admin dropping a table? If the only…
Rubrik -  - Hello World! Welcoming Rubrik’s Python SDK

Product

Hello World! Welcoming Rubrik’s Python SDK

Rubrik’s ecosystem is already huge–spanning on-premises infrastructure, from the edge to private cloud, and three big public cloud platforms–and continues to grow with each release. We recognize that most enterprises are undergoing some form of digital transformation and are in very different stages of embracing automation. That’s why we built our platform to integrate with many other vendors that can help meet specific business needs. However, with this flexibility comes the challenge of simplifying an ecosystem that uses a variety of programming languages. We selected Python as the next programming software development kit (SDK) to help address these challenges and empower all Rubrik users to be computer programmers. Python was designed as an easy-to-understand programming language and has gained popularity for being beginner-friendly. One of its creators, Guido van Rossum, even claimed to have built Python to empower “all users to be computer programmers.” Being a high-level language, Python reads like English, taking the stress of learning language-specific syntax off beginner coders. It handles and obfuscates much of the complexity, which allows you to learn programming concepts without worrying too much about details. When designing the Python SDK, we wanted to build with the same “philosophy of simplicity” that our…
Rubrik -  - Welcome to Polaris: Courtesy of Slack and Serverless Compute

General Tech

Welcome to Polaris: Courtesy of Slack and Serverless Compute

At Rubrik, one of the “good problems” we have is massive hyper-growth across teams, which means we have to find easy, scalable ways to communicate to each other. This was put to the test with our launch of the Polaris SaaS platform earlier this year, which led to the Sales Engineer team getting multiple “can I get access to the Polaris demo account?” requests every week. In order to create the new accounts, I simply log into Polaris and select the Invite Users link, and then a welcome email that includes all relevant login information would be sent to the team member requesting access. Even though the invite process was just a few clicks, as someone focused on all things DevOps and automation at Rubrik, a small part of me would shudder every time I had to manually repeat the invite process. That was until Chris Wahl decided to throw down the gauntlet. As a self-confessed Slack (our communication tool of choice) addict, I was immediately intrigued and got to work. I soon had a proof-of-concept Python script up and running that automated the new user invite process. But now what? How could I turn that basic script into a…
Rubrik -  - How We Built a Suite of Automated End-to-End Tests

Architecture

How We Built a Suite of Automated End-to-End Tests

Last week, I covered the importance of quality and why we employed automated end-to-end testing. In this post, I explain how we implement this approach. We do so through a release pipeline orchestrated by Jenkins to efficiently run a large suite of end-to-end tests. These tests leverage our custom testing framework which integrates with support tooling. As we receive customer feedback, we continuously update the framework and test cases to keep up with the latest requirements. Below, I describe in more detail our release pipeline, testing framework, and product support functions that ensure our testing is faster, more efficient, and always high quality. Jenkins Continuous Integration Like many engineering organizations, we use Jenkins as our continuous integration tool. As engineers check in new code, Jenkins is continuously running the suite of tests we built, including both unit tests and end-to-end tests. This allows us to quickly detect and correct issues. Release Pipeline If we ran every full test for every code check in, we would quickly exhaust all our test resources and file duplicate bugs. Although we can easily add more test resources, duplicate bugs waste engineering time by requiring extra triage and diagnosis work. Instead, we define a release…